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Spire Manchester becomes the first hospital in the North West of England to offer pioneering robotic assisted joint replacement surgery

31 October 2018

Spire Manchester has become the first hospital in the North West of England to implement the pioneering technology, Stryker Mako, a robotic-arm assisted joint replacement surgery. The private hospital has put itself at the forefront of innovative surgery by investing in new robotic-arm assisted total knee, partial knee and total hip replacement technology.

Robotic-arm assisted surgery is a new approach to joint replacement that offers the potential for a higher level of patient-specific implant alignment and positioning.1-3 The technology allows surgeons to create a patient-specific 3D plan and perform joint replacement surgery using a surgeon controlled robotic-arm that helps the surgeon execute the procedure with a high degree of accuracy.4-5 The tool aids precision surgery, helping reduce post-operative pain and speed up patient recovery time, making it the latest advancement in joint replacement surgery.

Professor Max Fehily, Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon at the hospital, said: “The Mako robotic-arm is transforming the way joint replacement surgeries are performed and we’re proud to be the first hospital in the North West of England to be using this technology and practicing some of the most advanced treatments available in medicine.

“Using a virtual 3D model, the Mako system allows surgeons to personalise each patients’ surgical plan pre-operatively, so there is a clear plan for how the surgeon will position the implant before entering the operating room. During surgery, the surgeon can validate that plan and make any necessary adjustments, while the robotic-arm then allows the surgeon to execute that plan with a high level of accuracy and predictability. The combination of these three features of the system has the potential to lead to better outcomes and higher patient satisfaction.”

Andrew Eadsforth, Hospital Director, said: “As the first hospital in the North West of England to introduce the Mako technology, Spire Manchester Hospital is incredibly proud to position itself at the forefront of advanced medicine, personalised surgical experiences and excellent care through introducing the Mako technology.”

“The benefits of the Mako robotic-arm mean that Spire Manchester Hospital is able to offer state-of-the-art care to each patient through the entire process, allowing an improved experience for both surgeons and patients alike.”

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Health Event

The public are invited to attend a free health event hosted at a Spire Manchester Hospital where they will find out more information on the Mako robotic-arm from expert Consultant Specialists, including Professor Max Fehily, who is the first Consultant at Spire Manchester to have undertaken a hip replacement using Mako. There will be an opportunity for attendees to ask the specialists any questions they may have on the Mako robotic-arm and the procedure.   

What: Specialist Consultants Professor Max Fehily and Professor Sanjiv Jari will be speaking on hip and knee conditions and the use of Mako.

  • Professor Max Fehily ‘Is it hip or is it groin pain?’ (9.30am – 10.30am)
  • Professor Sanjiv Jari ‘Does arthritic knee pain have to affect your daily life? Discussion on advanced treatment options - non surgical and surgical.’ (12pm – 1pm)

When: 3rd November 2018

Where: Spire Manchester Hospital, 170 Barlow Moor Road, Manchester, M20 2AF

For further information or to register for the free event please click here.

Event Booking Form

106879

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