Teenagers 'drink equivalent of a bathtub of sugary drinks each year'

28 November 2016

A new report has indicated that British youngsters aged between 11 and 18 drink almost a bathtub full of sugary drinks on average a year.

Data from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey has been analysed by Cancer Research UK, revealing that adults and young children are consuming twice the maximum recommended amount of added sugar at present.

Those aged between four to ten years old are drinking the equivalent of almost half a bathtub of sugary drinks each year, which could be having a significant impact on their health at this formative age.

A heavy intake of sugary drinks puts young people at an elevated risk of obesity. It has been shown that obese children are around five times more likely to grow into obese adults, which in turn increases their risk of cancer and other diseases.

Alison Cox, director of prevention at Cancer Research UK, said: "It's shocking that teenagers are drinking the equivalent of a bathtub of sugary drinks a year … The UK has an epidemic on its hands, and needs to act now."

Posted by Edward Bartel

 


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