Health experts advise rethink on England's alcohol guidelines

31 May 2012

Healthcare professionals could help save thousands of lives if they encourage patients to cut their daily alcohol intake to half a unit.

The recommendation works out at 5g per day and has been advised by experts writing in the online journal BMJ Open.

According to the health specialists, the new guidelines could result in 4,600 lives being saved in England per year.

This is because the authors noted that current recommendations by the government, which advises between 24g and 32g of alcohol a day for men and anywhere from 16g to 24g for women, are "not compatible with optimum protection of public health".

The experts added: "It is likely that government recommendations would need to be set at a much lower level than the current 'low risk' drinking guidelines in order to achieve [the best possible outcomes for public health]."

Prime minister David Cameron is also hoping to improve healthcare in the UK, by outlining plans to introduce a new public rating system for the country's NHS hospitals.

Posted by Philip Briggs


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