Virtual reality used to clear artery blockage

20 November 2015

The first clinical use of virtual reality to treat a blocked coronary artery has taken place, carried out by a team from the Institute of Cardiology in Warsaw, marking yet another milestone in the use of computer technology to deal with major health problems.

They successfully treated a 49-year-old male patient assisted by CTA projections that were viewed through a modified Google Glass with an optical head-mounted display.

It featured three-dimensional computed tomographic reconstructions, and was also equipped with a hands-free voice recognition system and a zoom function. The technology was specially developed by an interdisciplinary team at the University of Warsaw.

Researcher explained: "This case demonstrates the novel application of wearable devices for display of CTA data sets in the catheterisation laboratory that can be used for better planning and guidance of interventional procedures, and provides proof of concept that wearable devices can improve operator comfort and procedure efficiency in interventional cardiology.”

Posted by Edward Bartel

 

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