Men 'a third more likely to die from cancer than women'

30 January 2013

Men are more likely to die from cancer than women in the UK, according to an astonishing new study.

Cancer Research UK revealed that in 2010, 202 men per 100,000 died from cancer, compared with 147 women per 100,000. This represents a massive 35 per cent difference.

One of the reasons there is such a difference in figures between the sexes is the fact that men are diagnosed with cancers that tend to be a lot harder to treat. This includes liver, bladder and oesophagus cancer.

"The impact cancer has on younger men is often overlooked, but these are men whose life is cut too short by the disease," commented Professor Alan White, chairman of the Men’s Health Forum and co-author of the report based at Leeds Metropolitan University.

"Our report highlights just how big a problem cancer is and highlights the need to understand the reasons why men are more likely to die of cancer."

He concluded by saying that it is important the NHS leads the way in taking a proactive approach to preventing men from getting and dying from cancer prematurely.

Posted by Philip Briggs

Health News is provided by Adfero in collaboration with Spire Healthcare. Please note that all copy above is ©Adfero Ltd. and does not reflect views or opinions of Spire Healthcare unless explicitly stated. Additional comments on the page from individual Spire consultants do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of other consultants or Spire Healthcare.

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