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Anal warts (also called condyloma acuminata) are small growths of skin that appear around the anus. They can be removed and may be cut away using a surgical blade, a laser or a heated instrument, depending on their size and location.

Why you might need it

Anal warts are caused by a virus called human papilloma virus (HPV), which infects the top layers of your skin. They should be removed since they can grow and spread, causing discomfort, and can affect your bowel movements.

Removing the warts doesn't mean you are free from HPV. The virus can live in normal tissue for up to six months. This means you may still be infectious after this operation and warts may re-occur, needing further treatment.

We pride ourselves on our clinical excellence, you'll be looked after by an experienced multi-disciplinary care team.

Who will do it?

Our patients are at the heart of what we do and we want you to be in control of your care. To us, that means you can choose the consultant you want to see, and when you want. They'll be with you every step of the way.

All of our consultants are of the highest calibre and benefit from working in our modern, well-equipped hospitals.

Our consultants have high standards to meet, often holding specialist NHS posts and delivering expertise in complex sub-speciality surgeries. Many of our consultants have international reputations for their research in their specialised field.

 

Before your treatment

You will have a formal consultation with a healthcare professional. During this time you will be able to explain your medical history, symptoms and raise any concerns that you might have.

We will also discuss with you whether any further diagnostic tests, such as scans or blood tests, are needed. Any additional costs will be discussed before further tests are carried out.

Preparing for your treatment

We've tried to make your experience with us as easy and relaxed as possible.

For more information on visiting hours, our food, what to pack if you're staying with us, parking and all those other important practicalities, please visit our patient information pages.

Our dedicated team will also give you tailored advice to follow in the run up to your visit.

 

The procedure

Surgery to remove anal warts is usually done under general anaesthesia, which means you'll be asleep during the procedure and will feel no pain. If the warts are very small you may have a local anaesthetic, which means you'll be awake but the area will be numb. The procedure can take up to 45 minutes.

There are four options available for treating anal warts:

  • Electrocautery, also known as diathermy – during this procedure, warts are burnt off using a low-voltage electric current through a thin wire or probe. This method immediately seals the blood vessels, so no stitches are needed.
  • Loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) – this is similar to electrocautery, but the wire or probe has a loop on the end to remove the warts.
  • Surgical removal – this means warts are cut away using a scalpel and dissolvable stitches are used to close the wound.
  • Laser ablation – a high-energy beam of light destroys the warts and seals blood vessels so you won't need stitches.

Aftercare

Usually, surgery for anal warts is done as a day-case so you won't need to stay overnight in hospital.

After this, you will be taken to your room or comfortable area  where you can rest and recuperate until we feel you’re  ready to go  home.

If you are sore, you may need painkillers. Please discuss any discomfort with your nurse. You may be prescribed a mild laxative to make bowel movements easier. When you feel ready, you can begin to drink and eat, starting with clear fluids. If you need them, continue taking painkillers as advised by the hospital.

We will provide you with a supply of all the medicines your consultant feels you need to take home with you after you've left hospital, up to 14 days. This may be at an additional cost to some patients.


Recovery time

You may feel sore for several days. Your recovery time depends on how much surgery you had, but you should be able to go back to work within a few days. You can expect complete recovery in three weeks, by which time you should be able to resume normal activities.


How your loved ones can help

Once you’re ready to be discharged from hospital, you’ll need to arrange a taxi, friend or family member to take you home as you won’t be able to drive.


Looking after you

Even after you’ve left hospital, we’re still looking after you every step of the way. After surgery for anal warts, we will provide you with advice and follow-up support.

You will be given a date for a follow-up appointment and be monitored to see if the warts reoccur.

On rare occasions, complications following surgery for anal warts can occur. We will talk to you about the possible risks and complications of having this procedure and how they apply to you.

If you have any questions or concerns about your recovery, we're ready to help.

Why choose Spire?

We are committed to delivering excellent individual care and customer service across our network of hospitals, clinics and specialist care centres around the UK. Our dedicated and highly trained team aim to achieve consistently excellent results. For us it's more than just treating patients, it's about looking after people.

How much does it cost?

A fixed price for this treatment may be available on enquiry and following an initial consultation.

You can trust Spire Sussex Hospital to provide you with a single, fixed price (1) so there are no surprises. And, through our carefully chosen partner (2) you can even be considered for interest free finance.

We’re here to help you with making these important choices, so you’re then free to concentrate on your treatment and on getting back to being you.

(1) Important: Please read Spire’s terms and conditions for full details of what’s included and excluded in your fixed price* when paying for yourself.

(2) Zebra Finance Ltd trading as Zebra Health Finance , Lincoln House, Stephensons Way, Wyvern Business Park, Derby, DE21 6LY. 

Important to note

The treatment described on this page may be adapted to meet your individual needs, so it's important to follow your healthcare professional's advice and raise any questions that you may have with them.